Ted Talk: Don’t Misrepresent Africa

As I was selecting pictures for a September-November photo dump, I realized that I was (subconsciously or intentionally, not sure which) not including pictures of people within my community, particularly children. I do post pictures of people, but it’s been limited and in this case it was like I was specifically avoiding those types of photos. It led me to question why that was.

I think a thing that’s always worried me about this blog is that it’s probably the first thing people at home have really heard about Zambia, or, if they have, the only opportunity for a well rounded view. I had a woman repeatedly tell me how brave it was that I would go to a place so uncivilized as the vague, homogeneous Africa. So from a very early point in my service I’ve felt a lot of responsibility to present things in a way that are fair, and do people in Zambia justice.

The second part has been kind of on my radar as more and more images of short-term mission trips by various people pop up on my Facebook newsfeed. In them, there is usually a young white person, surrounded by a throng of smiling black children (who, of course, everyone assumes are orphans) and a sea of comments about how great it is to helping them, those anonymous children used as a backdrop. Which makes me think of the time a girl in college jokingly told me that she wanted to “adopt an African baby and then return it when it stops being cute.” A close PCV friend of mine summed it up really well the other day by asking “do people see pictures of our kids and think we’re taking mission trip photos?”

When photography first came to be, many cultures feared it would steal your essence, a notion that is laughed off today, but is it really so far off? You put this image of yourself out into this world, and it stops being you. “You,” the image of you, becomes whatever other people want to see, what they think “you” are. And is it fair for me to throw images of my community members out into this world without them fully understanding how much the world will warp that image? To me, people in my community have dimension and reality. When pictures are posted by me, they become flat, malleable to whatever the viewer wants to see (or, perhaps worse, what I want the viewer to see). Comfort ceases being himself and becomes “that little African boy Nick posted.” A friend’s house stops being beautiful or well-made and becomes something that wouldn’t fit American standards for a dwelling. I stop being being a random guy bumbling through life and become this disgusting white savior trope, a whitewashed lead in a story that isn’t mine. Sometimes it feels like a lose-lose.

While this TED Talk focuses more on journalism photography, I found it to ring very true for me. I think it gave me some food for thought on proceeding, and I hope it will for you too.


TED Talk: How Trees Talk to Each Other

Dating back until at least middle school, I have wished I could see time lapse footage of root movement in a forest. Specifically, when my dad told me we couldn’t plant a Weeping Willow in our backyard because of their knack for finding water pipes and bursting them, it just seemed to me that trees weren’t nearly as static as we think they are. This thought was later built upon when I took an ecology and evolution summer class in college, and my professor explained that the trees are constantly fighting one another for sunlight, albeit so slowly that humans do not perceive it without something like time lapse.

So, these ideas had been on my radar for some time. However, when my sister sent me this video just prior to my departure, it blew my mind. It was exciting and magical, while tragically hopeless and sad about what we have destroyed.


If you found this interesting, there is a very interesting book that takes this topic from another interpretation: that the fungi (closer in DNA to animals than plants) is actually farming/herding the trees. It is called Mycelium Running, and while I have been unable to find a copy in Zambia I have heard a lot of great things about it from an impassioned fellow volunteer.



What the hell am I up to? Well, I just started a project that I’m very excited about, and have been wanting to do for some time. MTV has been airing a PEPFAR commissioned television program called Shuga. Shuga is stunning in the fact that it showcases the talent of African countries (Kenya, Nigeria, and South Africa so far). Any Lupita Nyong’o fans out there? This was her first big role. It is also an incredible public health project, weaving important sexual health information into compelling story-lines. I took a public health class in college where we talked about the massive impact soap operas have on public health campaigns, and I firmly believe that if Zambia had more domestic soap operas our rates of Malaria and HIV would be much lower (ask literally any volunteer in Zambia; I mention it about once every minute).

Anyways, how does this relate to me? Well, my school has electricity, my teachers have televisions, and I have a flash drive. This will hopefully be a winning combination. I just finished transcribing the first season of Shuga into scripts, and tomorrow will start the process of edition my inevitable mistakes and printing out 15-30 copies of each script. The plan is to start a drama club with my local school’s grade 9s, where we do table reads once a week paired with GRS activities. At the end of each month, we will have hopefully finished the episode and can watch it on TV! I’m beyond pumped, which obviously means my expectations are much higher than my ability to successfully pull this off!

By the way, y’all in America should absolutely watch this show! Specifically, the woman who told me I should wear gloves at all times in Zambia to avoid contracting AIDS should watch this show, because she still has a lot to learn about HIV/AIDS. Bless her ignorant little heart. But seriously, the situations in Shuga are in no way limited to the continent of Africa. I personally could relate to specific story arcs within the show, and there are many people in the states who have never had comprehensive sexual education.


TED Talk: ‘Every Kid Needs a Champion’

I first saw this video when training to work with Parks and Recreation, and it’s stuck with me ever since. Development work, at it’s best, is a lot of teaching, so it’s been cropping up in my consciousness a lot more than I expected, and to be honest I’ve used a lot of her examples in almost ever single meeting/program I’ve had so far. I think it’s also pretty busy to become bitter and jaded* during your service for a lot of reasons, so the segment from 6:19 to 5:35 has looped around in my head quite a lot, and I once accidentally plagiarized part of it during a group chat discussion, only to realize after the fact!

Anyways, if you can’t tell I absolutely love this video and will just let it speak for itself.

*I want to make a cocktail called a “Bitter and Jaded” and so far the only two ingredients I can think of are bitters and absinthe. If anyone has any suggestions for possibly a better green liquor or anything that would pair well with bitters, hit me up!

When Life Gives You Lemons, Squeeze Them In Your Eyes to Give You an Excuse for Crying 

Sometimes life gets overwhelming and you feel like a volcano about to erupt or, in my case, a deadly pyroclastic flow. Through the haze of it all the ash (yes, I am going to milk this metaphor for all it’s worth) it can be hard to see everything else around you. In these times, it’s nice when friends remind you to take a step back a reasses from afar. Today, I spent my day painting all my furniture a calming blue and charged my iPod just enough to play some tunes. It was nice, even though I got blue paint on two of my favorite articles of clothing. 

I really miss Steven Universe, one of my favorite shows, and so it was nice when this song popped up. And I feel like my iPod is trying to tell me I need to be more mindful. 


Featured Video: ‘The Story of Bottled Water’

Trash services here are virtually, if not totally, non-existent in most towns and villages. I have a rubbish pit behind my house, and once that is full it’ll be covered with soil until everything breaks down. This probably worked well in the past, but the prevalence of plastic means that, when digging my garden (a former rubbish pit, I am knee deep in plastic wrappers and bottles that adamantly refuse to decompose for another couple hundred years or so (note: this is essentially a mini version of an American landfill).

The interesting thing is, people used to use better equipment. I’ve seen pictures and heard of beautiful hand-made clay pots that people used to carry water in, or store food in. There’s actually a way of refrigerating food in those pots, in which you put a small one inside another one and fill the space with sand. I don’t think Zambian people would use the term “ice cold,” but the water would be as cold as from a mountain stream, and the pots would keep food fresh for days, even weeks. “What happened to those pots?” I’ve asked many times. The answer is simple: they were told the pots were backwards, that plastic was modern and the way forward and more sustainable. People wanted that, and gradually people stopped making them, and eventually forgot how to make them at all. Now, after just a few decades, the elders will tell you that the young children today wouldn’t even know what the pots were if they saw them. And the “modern, sustainable” plastic? It breaks, and gives way, and it doesn’t preserve food, but it’s waste will be littered across the landscape for centuries.

Anyways, while this video focuses solely on plastic water bottles, it really makes you think about how much plastic waste is out there in the world! Reducing, reusing, and recycling is key to conserving our resources and making this world somewhere we can happily live in.

P.S. Many stores (MOMs, for example) make an effort to use biodegradable packaging whenever possible. Consumer purchases have a huge effect on how companies conduct business, so please support biodegradable/compostable packing!


TED Talk: ‘The Magic Washing Machine’

It’s currently dry season, specifally, hot dry season. That means the rivers and streams flow at their lowest points, wells dry up, and people women have to travel further out to find water. I’m very lucky, as I have a perineal well just meters from my doorstep, and although the natural spring I go to for drinking water no longer babbles, there’s still water available at only a ten minute walk. However, many women in my community spend a significant amount of their working days carrying water. They’re not like me, carrying just enough to drink from the spring, or just enough to bathe once a day from a nearby well. They’re carrying water for themselves and their families, to drink, cook with, and bathe twice a day. They’re also carrying water for their gardens, for the ability to provide essential nutrients for their children, and for economic support in the lean season. Roads and electricity dominate to table of discussion for development in Zambia , but I sometimes stop and wonder if, were more women (specially rural women) at the table, if plumbing and running water would be emphasized more.

This talk explains what I’ve observed in a truly amazing way. It also encapsulates my criticisms of the “population bomb” argument, not because population growth isn’t an important issue, but because of the way it’s often coded to shift  responsibility from us, the global north, the standard setters of materialism as development, using the most resources per capita globally, onto women in Zambia who walk kilometers to find water. How can we justify people in the global south not being afforded modern amenities that, to us in the global north, are essential?